Patient Information

teeth whitening services

At the dental office of Jeffrey T. Allen, DDS, we strive to make your experience with us as comfortable and hassle-free as possible. 

Therefore, we have provided Patient Forms for patients to fill out prior to their visit.

These forms include your New Patient Form, Smile Evaluation and our Cancellation Policy. We look forward to putting you on a path to better oral health. See our post-operative instructions and frequently asked questions and answers below for additional information.

Post-Operative Instructions

The following instructions are courtesy of Dr. Jeffrey Allen’s office in Bloomington, IN and should be read after you have any of the following dental procedures in our office.

Crowns and Bridges

Crowns and Bridges Post-Operative Instructions
Refrain from eating at least 2 hours until the anesthesia has worn off.

Temporary:
A temporary is a crown or bridge that is placed on the prepared teeth while the final restoration is being made. The temporary serves a very important purpose. It protects the exposed dentin so it is not sensitive, prevents food and bacteria from collecting on the prepared teeth, and prevents the tooth from shifting or moving, which can make seating of the final restoration more difficult.
The temporary is placed with lightweight cement that is designed to come off easily so avoid chewing sticky foods such as gum, caramels and etc.
Use your toothbrush to clean the temporary as you normally do our other teeth. However, when flossing, it is best to pull the floss through the contact rather than lift up on the temporary so you do not accidentally loosen the temporary. If your temporary comes off between appointments, slip it back on and call our office so that we can recement it for you. A little denture adhesive placed inside the crown can help to hold it in place in the interim.

Sensitivity:
Sensitivity, especially to cold, is common for a time following treatment. For the first few days avoid extremely hot or cold foods and beverages. It is normal to have discomfort in the gums around the tooth after the anesthesia wears off due to the procedure.
If your gums are tender, rinse with warm salt water, dissolving ½ teaspoon of salt in an 8 oz. glass of warm water. An analgesic such as Tylenol or Advil will increase your comfort.

Final Crown or Bridge:
After the final cementation of our restoration, it may take a few day to get used to the new corn or bridge. If your bite feels unbalanced, please be sure to call our office for an appointment for a simple adjustment.

Home Care:
Although crowns and bridges are often the most durable of all restorations, the underlying tooth is still vulnerable to decay, especially at the interface between the tooth and crown. It is important to resume regular brushing and flossing immediately. Daily home care and regulating your intake of sugar-containing foods will increase the longevity of your new restorations.

Dentures

Dentures Post-Operative Instructions

The following suggestions are presented to assist you in learning to use and properly care for your new dentures. If you have had teeth removed in conjunction with the placement of new dentures, you may also refer to Post-Operative Instructions for breaking in.

Breaking in Period: Most new dentures require a breaking in period before they become comfortable. This length of time varies with each individual patient depending upon their ability, determination, and perseverance to learn how to use them. You must first learn to keep them in place, and then gradually start to use them.

What to expect: It is normal for you to feel awkward at first with your new dentures. Your appearance has probably undergone a slight change, your speech may seem altered, and you feel certain that your mouth is too full. Time, patience and some training will soon bring about a relaxation of the facial muscles and begin to alleviate some of the apparent problems.

Looseness: If you have had teeth removed immediately prior to placement of the denture, it may feel loose, due mainly to the gum shrinkage that occurs as the gums heal. Complete healing of the gums and the underlying bone takes 3-6 months. During this period of temporary liner may be placed inside the denture to keep it relatively snug. Denture adhesives will also help in this regard. Once healing is complete, a permanent liner will be placed, and simply closing your teeth together and swallowing will help to seat the dentures by removing air and saliva from the interface.

Sore Spots: Soreness from uneven pressure on the gums may develop at any time, and is not unusual, especially if you have not worn a denture before. Sore spots are best corrected if the dentures are worn at least 3-6 hours before returning to the office for an adjustment appointment. This can allow a precise detection of the offending areas inside the denture, which are corrected by trimming.

Eating: Start with soft foods or those that are easy to chew. Take small bites and chew slowly, trying to overcome the difficulties as they arise. Keep the food distributed evenly on both sides and chew on the back teeth. To bite foods that normally require the front teeth, such as streak and carrots will require a gradual learning curve. Initially, it is recommended that you avoid chewing gum or attempt to eat sticky or chewy foods.

Speaking: Learning to talk with our new dentures in place requires some patience and perseverance. Reading aloud is a very good way to learn to enunciate distinctly, especially those sounds or words that are not clear. Try to avoid those movements of the lips and tongue that tend to displace the dentures or cause them to click. Careful practice and repetition may help to hasten the process and produce a return to your normal, confident speech.

Mouth and Denture Hygiene: It is extremely important to clean your dentures with a soft brush and a cleaning paste, or soapy water, after each meal. Food particles that are trapped under the denture can cause inflammation of the gums and sore spots. You should remove your dentures for at least 6 hours daily, usually when going to bed at night, to give your gum tissues a rest. During this time, the dentures can be cleansed and placed in a small tub of water to prevent them from drying out, which a cause the dentures to distort and not fit well. At least once a week, place them in an enzymatic or special cleaning solution to remove those otherwise insoluble stains and proteins. Because foods will stick to the soft tissues of your mouth, it is also beneficial to brush the roof of your mouth and your tongue daily. Massaging and stimulation these tissues will reduce the incidence of inflammation and sore spots.

If your dentures were placed over new extraction sites (immediate dentures), you may wear the dentures at night for the first 3 days. This will help to promote clotting, and prevent irritations to those sites. You may then resume the directions preciously described and remove the dentures when sleeping.

Be sure to have your dentures checked at least once annually as changes in the mouth, such as bone loss, and a wearing of the teeth will inevitably occur. Careful maintenance of the dentures and the supporting soft tissues will help to slow down these changes.

Extractions


Refrain from eating at least 2 hours and until the anesthesia has worn off.

  • The initial healing period usually takes one to two weeks, and you will likely experience some swelling for the first forty-eight hours.
  • Avoid chewing for two hours following surgery, or until the numbness has completely worn off. Some discomfort after the extraction is normal.
  • Be sure to take any antibiotic medication prescribed for you as it will help the area to heal. An analgesic may also be recommended for your comfort and can be taken as directed.
  • To avoid nausea, do not take pain medication on an empty stomach.
  • You can also decrease pain and swelling by applying an ice pack twenty minutes on, twenty minutes off for the first six hours following the tooth extraction(s).
  • A blood clot will form on the extraction site, and this clot is vital to the healing process. To keep the clot intact, avoid touching the extraction site with your tongue or fingers, do not drink liquids through a straw, and do not spit or swish vigorously.
  • Blowing your nose or sneezing violently can also dislodge the blood clot and impair healing, so if you have an upper respiratory infection or suffer from allergies, be sure to have the appropriate medication on hand.
  • Do not rinse your mouth the day of the surgery. Smoking, or allowing food particles to pack into the tooth’s socket, should be avoided, as both will significantly affect the healing process.
  • Twenty-four hours following the procedure, you can rinse gently with warm saltwater solution. (Dissolving one teaspoon of salt with one cup of warm water. Gently swish the solution around the affected area, and spit carefully.) You should do this two to three times each day for the week following the extraction.
  • Relax as much as possible and avoid all strenuous activities for the first twenty-four hours following surgery.
  • Once the numbness has worn off, you should eat, as nourishment is important to the healing process. Limit your diet to soft foods like yogurt, soft soups, ice cream, or soft-cooked eggs for the first forty-eight hours, and drink at least eight large glasses of water or fruit juice each day.
  • Keep your head elevated with pillows to control bleeding. We will give you a supply of gauze sponges to place over the bleeding area.
  • Change the pad as necessary, and use them until the bleeding has turned to a slightly pink shade. You can also bite gently on a moist tea bag for twenty minutes. Be sure to call our office if the bleeding persists or increases at (812)332-1028.
  • The space left by the tooth will feel a bit strange to you at first. Eventually, new bone and gum tissue will grow into the gap left by the extraction.

Fillings

Fillings Post-Operative Instructions
Refrain from eating at least 2 hours until the anesthesia has worn off.

Sensitivity:
Sensitivity, especially to cold, is common for a time following treatment. For the first few days avoid extremely hot or cold foods and beverages. It is normal to have discomfort in the gums around the tooth after the anesthesia wears off due to the procedure.

If your gums are tender, rinse with worm salt water, dissolving ½ teaspoon of salt in an 8 oz. glass of warm water. An analgesic such as Tylenol or Advil will help to increase your comfort.

The New Filling:
After the placement of your new restoration, it may take a few days to get used to it. If your bite feels unbalanced, please be sure to call our office for an appointment for a simple adjustment.

Home Care:
Although the treatment that was performed is quite durable, the underlying tooth is still vulnerable to decay, especially at the interface between the tooth and filling. It is important to resume regular brushing and flossing immediately. Daily home care and regulating your intake of sugar-containing foods will increase the longevity of your new restoration.

Porcelain Veneers

Porcelain Veneers Post-Operative Instructions

Do not eat for at least 2 hours and until the anesthesia has worn off.

Temporary: A temporary is an acrylic or composite veneer that is placed on the prepared tooth for protection during the time the porcelain veneers and constructed in the lab. The temporary serves several important purposes: it protects the exposed dentin to minimize sensitivity, protects from shifting and last but not least, restores tooth contour and appearance. The temporary is put on with cement that is designed to come off easily so avoid chewing sticky foods such as Carmel, taffy and gum. Also avoid hard foods: nuts, eating corn on the cob and apples. Use your toothbrush to clean the temporary as you normally do your other teeth. If you are having more than one veneer done and your temporaries are fused together you may need a rinse. To avoid possibly loosening the temporary, it is best to pull the floss through the contact and pulling it straight out, do not pull it down or your temporary might possibly come off.

If your temporary comes off between appointments, slip it back on and call the off so we can re-cement it for you. A small amount of denture adhesive placed inside of temporary to help hold it in place in the interim.

Sensitivity: Sensitivity, especially to cold, is common for a time following treatment. For the first few days avoid extremely hot or cold foods and beverages.

Root Canals

Root Canal Post-Operative Instructions:

Refrain from eating for at least 2 hours and until the anesthesia has worn off to prevent possible injury to your lips and cheeks. This time interval will also allow the temporary filling to set to a reasonable hardness. We expect your tooth to be sore to chewing and biting pressure so you should avoid very hard or chewy foods. This should gradually decrease within 7-10 days after treatment.

Be sure to take any antibiotic medication prescribed for you as it will help the area to heal. An analgesic may also be recommended for your comfort and can be taken as directed.
If you have any of the following signs or symptoms please call our office as these complications do not occur routinely:

  • A reaction to the prescribed medication
  • Increasing tenderness or swelling in the area surrounding the tooth
  • The temporary filling dislodges from the tooth
  • The tooth fractures

A crown or other final restoration should be place within a short time interval after root canal therapy is completed unless we have advised you otherwise.

Scaling and Root Planing

Scaling and Root Planing Post-Operative Instructions

Scaling and root planing therapy is a procedure that involves removing bacterial plaque and tartar from the root surface below the gum line with instruments and ultrasonics. It may also require removal of diseased tissue within the pocket with a laser. The goal of this treatment is to allow reattachment of the gums to the clean root surface and to shrink the periodontal pockets to levels that can be maintained by daily flossing and brushing. The following guidelines have been prepared for you in order to maximize healing and minimize any discomfort.

Refrain from eating for at least 2 hours and until the anesthesia has worn off.

Things to Avoid for the first 24 hours:

  • Vigorous physical exercise, but you may return to work
  • Drinking through a straw or sucking motions.
  • Do not smoke. It is better to refrain for 48 hours.
  • Drinking alcoholic beverages will retard the healing process.
  • Foods that is extreme in temperature or spicy.
  • Avoid using any strong mouthwashes that contain alcohol.

Things to Do:

  • You may take a non-aspirin analgesic to relieve any tenderness or discomfort, such as ibuprofen (Advil) or acetaminophen (Tylenol).
  • Eat a well-balanced soft diet for today. You may chew on the opposite side of the treated area until it is comfortable to chew normally.
  • Rinse with a warm salt water rinse, a teaspoon in an 8 oz. glass of water, 3 times a day.
  • Brush your teeth very lightly in the treated area the first night. Then begin flossing lightly as well the next day, gradually increasing to normal force by the week’s end.
  • After flossing and brushing, rinse with chlorhexidine gluconate (Peridex), if it was prescribed, for at least 60 seconds. Do this at least twice daily. Chloraseptic and Cepastat are recommended mouthwashes.
  • Several days after treatment your gums should begin to appear pinker, less swollen and will bleed less when you floss. These are signs of healing and improving periodontal health. If you have any questions or problems, please call our office.

Frequently Asked Questions

What does my insurance cover when it comes to Dental Cosmetics?

Insurance should always be an aid in your treatment, not a guideline for what types of treatment are available. Generally, insurance will pay a percentage of the services you receive from our office up to a set yearly maximum. Unfortunately, insurance plans from your employer will most likely not cover everything.

While Dr. Allen does file most dental benefit plans, he does not accept HMO, Medicare and Medicaid. When you have an appointment at our office, we will provide an estimate of what portion of the service your employer’s plan will pay. We ask that you pay your portion of that fee at the time of your visit. The assignment of most benefit plans takes about 30 days.

Please contact our Financial Coordinator or Practice Manager with any questions regarding your dental plan. The popularity of cosmetic dentistry continues to increase, and you can take advantage of this service without depending on your insurance! Jeffrey T. Allen DDS offers financing for your convenience so your dreams of a new, beautiful smile can become your reality.

If I don’t have insurance, how can I pay for the services I need?

Dr. Allen has a philosophy that dentistry should be affordable, and not just to those who have insurance. There are a number of different payment options available to our patients including Visa, MasterCard and Discover. Extended payment options are also available through CareCredit finance. This option is interest-free (0%), convenient, and offer low monthly payment plans.
Please take advantage of these different financing options! We offer them because we want you to be able to afford the smile you’ve always wanted. If you have additional questions, or would like more details about any of our financing options, please contact our Financial Coordinator or Practice Manager.

How do I schedule an appointment?

Scheduling an appointment is easy! Simply contact our office either via a phone call or email and we will work with you to find a time that fits into your day.

If you are a first time client, welcome! When you first come to our office, you will be asked to fill out some basic information that we will need to establish you as a patient. This information will be requested once you arrive at our office. However, if you would like to fill out this information ahead of time, we would encourage you to download, and print the forms at the top of this page. Fill them out at your convenience and bring them to the office with you for your appointment. We look forward to seeing you!

Financing Options

Carecredit

CareCredit Options
CareCredit offers two types of payment plans:

No Interest (If paid within the promotional period. Minimum monthly payments required)

Low Interest

Payment Methods
We accept Visa, MasterCard, and Discover. We also accept personal checks and cash.

We Accept and Prepare Most Major Insurances

Network Provider for Aetna, Anthem, Assurant, Cigna, Connection Dental, Delta Dental, Dental Blue 200/300, Dental Wellness, Dentemax, Federal Employee Program, GEHA, Guardian, HRI, Humana, Maverest, Metlife, Principle, SIHO, United Concordia

Print Version Print Version       Send to a friend Send to a friend      

Contact Information

Jeffrey T. Allen, DDS

359 E Winslow Road
Bloomington, IN 47401

Phone: 812-332-1028

 

 

We Accept and Prepare Most Major Insurances

Network Provider for: Aetna, Anthem, Assurant, Cigna, Connection Dental, Delta Dental, Dental Blue 200/300, Dental Wellness, Dentemax, Federal Employee Program, GEHA, Guardian, HRI, Maverest, Metlife, Principle, SIHO, United Concordia

We accept Medicaid!